The End of Congress: Planned Obsolescence

I am being offered an opportunity right now by a company called Amplifyd to receive donations through its marketing efforts for any cause that I would like to advance. Not only would they raise funds through this effort for United Progressives, they would have a large bank of callers contacting Congressmen and lobbying for our cause.

I’ve been weighing this offer for several days, and trying to decide what a worthy cause might be. The company is set to launch on June 10, so I’m out of time.

I’ve long held the view that lobbying Congress is not worth the effort. I’ve also been very focused on developing the foundation for a campaign to develop direct democracy. Direct democracy is the only real solution left for Americans to gain control of their government. The political parties have been completely bought out, and you can’t throw a good apple into a barrel of bad ones and expect it to survive. It’s over with. The legislature and the president will do as they please, according to the dictates of all the major corporate interests involved. They will not vote against their own interests. Fresh raw meat will not be torn from the mouth of a hungry wolf.

A campaign that attempts to persuade people that their little donation is going to help change government is disingenuous. We know what the truth is.

As to direct democracy, I am currently investigating software research and technology that would enable the establishment of an online database of standing opinions every citizen has on any issue of relevance to the constitutional rights we hold dear. It would be similar to a survey, but not a survey in the sense that it would be a permanent index of any opinion you wish to share publicly on fracking, on free trade, on LGBT issues, on Iran and Ukraine, and anything else Americans ought to have a voice in. Each person would have an account, and be able to go into it and add opinions and change them at will. A summary of all opinions would also be available on a graphic readout so that popular opinion for and against various positions would be accessible to everyone.

It should act in many respects like the stock market, in which you would be able to gauge the value of an opinion just as you would the value of a stock, and a ticker would be up all the time. Fluctuations in public opinion should become immediately evident, based upon events as they unfold.

It would also become an organization. The positions taken by the public in this database would become the immediate advocacy for it. This would be the beginning stage of direct democracy. The size of this database, and the extent to which it truly measured public opinion, and the willingness of people to participate, would be fundamental to its success.

In the end it would have power. It would empower people when they know what most people agree to. It would enable a shadow government, a people willing to establish their own laws and economic processes by means of social media tied directly to it. People will always act when they know others will support them and they don’t feel alone in what they say and do. And it would be like Occupy, with power distributed horizontally at all times, and advocacy based upon the voice of everyone.

The long term consequence of such an effort could be the revolutionary co-opting of government powers, through the disenfranchisement of the legislature and presidential directives. Direct democracy ideally needs no legislature, beyond law clerks capable of expediting the will of the people.

The fundamental truth, however, is that the people of the United States must organize, if they want to control their destiny, and are to have any hope of wresting control of their economic and political strength from those who now are in possession of it. We have to act now, and begin to build the foundation, while we still can. Corporate interests will eventually put up barriers to it, and the vestiges of net neutrality will soon disappear.

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